Close
Learning Methods
Classroom
A traditional classroom couples on-site learning with the added value of face-to-face interaction with instructors and peers. With courses and exams scheduled worldwide, you will be sure to find a class near you.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via face-to-face
Components (May Include)
Onsite
On-site instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available two weeks prior to the course start date; printed course materials ship directly to the event location
Duration
One + Days
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple days
Technical Needs
Specific requirements are clearly noted on the course page
Virtual Classroom
Ideal for those who appreciate live education instruction, but looking to save on travel. A virtual classroom affords you many of the same learning benefits as traditional–all from the convenience of your office.
Interaction
Highly Interactive
On-going interaction with instructor throughout the entire virtual classroom event
Interaction with peers/professionals via online environment
Components (May Include)
Live online instructor-led delivery of course modules, discussions, exercises, case studies, and application opportunities
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, tools and templates, articles and/or white papers
E-course materials available up to one week prior to the course start date. Recorded playback and supplemental materials available up to seven days after the live event.
Duration
Varies by course ranging from one to multiple sessions
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Phone line access
E-Learning
A self-paced, online learning experience that allows you to study any time of day. Course material is pre-recorded by an instructor and you have the flexibility to view content modules as desired.
Interaction
Independent Learning
Components (May Include)
Pre-Recorded
Pre-recorded course modules
Supplemental learning elements such as: audio/video files, online quizzes
E-course materials start on the day of purchase
Optional purchased print material ships within 7 business days
Duration
60 Days - Anytime
60-day access starts on the day of purchase
Direct access to all components
Technical Needs
Adobe Flash Player
Acrobat Reader
Computer with sound capability and high-speed internet access
Close
Contact Sponsor
E-Reward
Online
Paul Thompson
Phone: 1 44 01614322584
Contact by Email | Website
Close
Sorry, you can't add this item to the cart.
You have reached the maximum allowed quantity for purchase in your cart or the item isn't available anymore.
Product successfully added to your cart!
Price
View your cart
Continue shopping
WORKSPAN
WORKSPAN DAILY |

Equity Plan Participants Average $100K in Vested Stock

The average vested value of United States workers’ equity compensation is $97,711 and the average total value of their equity compensation is $149,835.

Image

This is according to research from Schwab Stock Plan Services, which examined the behaviors of 1,000 equity compensation plan participants who currently receive incentive stock options or restricted stock awards and/or participate in employee stock purchase plans (ESPPs). Of those surveyed, 41% have exercised or sold at least some of their equity compensation during their career. Their main reasons for selling included:

  • Thinking market conditions were favorable (41%),
  • Being fully vested and wanting to cash out (27%), and
  • Wanting to make a large purchase (25%).

The vast majority of those who have exercised their benefit (88%) said they were very or extremely confident about selling. Millennials were more likely to be extremely confident in that decision than their Generation X or Baby Boomer counterparts (62%, compared to 36% and 40%, respectively). 

Among those who have never sold or exercised their equity compensation, the top reasons were:

  • Waiting for more favorable market conditions (38%),
  • Being concerned about tax implications (30%), and
  • Waiting for their equity compensation to become fully vested (28%).

Equity Compensation: Playing a Role in Employees’ Financial Future
By and large, respondents consider equity compensation a long-term asset. 60% said they will use it to help finance retirement, ranking it far above any other choice. For example, the next highest selections were financing their children’s education at 9%, financing their lifestyle in the short term at 8%, and paying off debt and buying a home, both at 5%.

Equity compensation makes up more than a quarter (27%) of employees’ net worth, on average — and more for Millennials than any other group (41%, versus 21% for Gen X and 20% for Boomers), as they have had less time in the workforce and less time to accrue assets through other investments. Most respondents (68%) also hold company stock outside of their equity compensation plan, primarily in their 401(k) plan.

Encouragingly, most participants are confident they will be able to use their equity compensation to reach their financial goals. 65% said they are very or extremely confident, and another 28% say they are somewhat confident.  

“It’s great to see that equity plan participants feel so confident about their benefits. However, some may encounter obstacles to meeting their goals if they remain overweighted in company stock. At Schwab, we suggest having no more than 10-20% of your overall portfolio in company stock,” said Amy Reback, vice president, Schwab Stock Plan Services. “Creating a financial plan — especially with help from a professional – can help you take a more holistic approach to managing your money.”  

A Differentiator for Employers
The survey reveals the important role of equity compensation in the employer-employee relationship. About a third of respondents (31%) said it is an essential benefit and another 44% said it is very important. These respondents named the following advantages of equity compensation:

  • It allows them to participate in the growth of their company (51%),
  • It will help them significantly build/increase their wealth (50%), and
  • It means the success of the company will play an important part in their own success (43%).

Nearly one in three respondents (28%) said the equity compensation offering was the reason or one of the main reasons they took their job, and that figure rises to 46% among Millennials. Moreover, 29% of participants said they wouldn’t consider another job until after their next vesting event, and 12% wouldn’t consider an offer from another company at all.

A Desire for Guidance
Most respondents, 82%, would like their employer to offer more education to help them understand equity compensation programs. The specific areas in which they want help from their employer include:

  • Planning for retirement (68%),
  • Using equity compensation to meet financial goals (55%),
  • Developing a financial plan (52%), and
  • Balancing equity compensation with other investments (51%).

More than half (54%) of respondents are already working with a financial advisor, and 78% of that group are getting help from the advisor with their equity compensation. Millennials are most likely to work with an advisor (60%), followed by Boomers (53%) and Gen Xers (47%).  

Other Notable Findings

  • When asked which sectors provide the best long-term value for employees with equity compensation, respondents named technology (31%), health care (19%) and financial services (17%). All other choices ranked substantially lower. 
  • 61% who are offered financial wellness resources at work currently use them. Financial wellness resources can include digital tools, financial coaching, education and other solutions to help employees take ownership of their personal finances.