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Companies Continue to Rely on Flexible Workforces as Demand for Products and Services Remains Uncertain

Dec. 8, 2010 —  Manpower says employers are continuing to hire flexible workers due to increased demand for their goods and services coupled with lingering economic uncertainty, as the November U.S. jobs report released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed the economy only created 39,000 jobs and the unemployment rate crept up to 9.8%.

"This uncertainty over the sustainability of the recovery, and the fact that there is yet to be breakthrough in demand, means companies remain committed to doing more with less," said Jeff Joerres, Manpower Inc. Chairman and CEO. "However, firms are seeing some demand, so they are taking on flexible or temporary workers until it becomes more robust. The number of temporary jobs created continues to rise accordingly."

The U.S. economy added 40,000 temporary jobs in November, and temporary jobs have been increasing since September 2009.

In countries such as Germany and Asia-Pacific nations where the recovery is gathering pace, the biggest threat to growth is the mismatch between the skills employers need and the talent available. Where employers are hiring in the U.S., they are being very specific about the skills they are looking for, which means workers who have recently been laid off are faring better than the long-term unemployed.

"Employers are worried that candidates who have been out work for extended periods may have suffered from antiquation of their skills, which is a red flag when they are searching for such specificity of skills," Joerres said. "December and January are traditionally weak months for hiring, so we think it will be a while yet before we see the much-awaited breakthrough in hiring."

Related News: Recession Caused Many Employers to Rely on Temporary Workforce (Dec. 8, 2010)

Contents © 2010 WorldatWork. No part of this article may be reproduced, excerpted or redistributed in any form without express written permission from WorldatWork.


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